Buildout data for Each Municipality within the New York / New Jersey Highlands Regional Assessment Study Area

(US Census/TIGER 1:100,000 Boundaries)

Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Buildout data processed in the regional context of the USDA Forest Service Highlands Study by the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Publication_Date: 2002
Title:
Buildout data for Each Municipality within the New York / New Jersey Highlands Regional Assessment Study Area (US Census/TIGER 1:100,000 Boundaries)
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data
Series_Information:
Series_Name:
New York / New Jersey Regional Assessment Update (2001-02) directed by the USDA Forest Service
Publication_Information:
Publisher: USDA Forest Service
Online_Linkage: \\Dog\dog1\data\hl02\buildout\hl_mun_bdout.shp
Larger_Work_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: USDA Forest Service
Publication_Date: 2002
Title:
New York / New Jersey Regional Assessment Update (2001-02): Technical Report
Description:
Abstract:
(FOR FULL BUILDOUT DOCUMENTATION, PLEASE REFER TO THE HIGHLANDS STUDY TECHNICAL REPORT >> LINK AVAILABLE UNDER 'CROSS-REFERENCE' IN THIS METADATA FILE)

A simple way to consider future change would be to simply answer the question, "How much could be built TODAY under existing zoning and environmental constraints?" Basically, that is the question the buildout analysis seeks to answer. The analysis can also be expanded to include a few different future policy scenarios in order to demonstrate a variety of future population distributions.

For an area being analyzed, the process begins by removing from consideration places that would simply not be realistic for future development. These areas might include lands that are rendered unbuildable due to natural features, areas in which an existing policy prohibits development, urban areas already developed to their fullest legal extent, and permanently preserved properties (including public lands). The remaining areas are analyzed to find out how many houses could be built on them under the current zoning restrictions, with some recognition of additional infrastructure needs.

The first step of the build-out analysis for the Highlands was to map "vacant" land, i.e. privately owned land that was presently not developed. The second step was further exclude land based on various regulatory constraints. In order to provide multiple outcomes, two different scenarios were constructed to show potential patterns of varying impacts: Low-constraint scenario map of areas that would presumably develop if current policies (including zoning) were continued unchanged indefinitely, and High-constraint scenario map of areas that would presumably develop if a few current policies (excluding zoning) were changed to increase the constraints on future development. After removing these constrained areas, the remaining area was then considered "available" for residential development.

Purpose:
New York/New Jersey Regional Assessment Update (2001-02):

The Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, participated in the NY-NJ Highlands Regional Assessment Update (Fiscal Year 2001), directed by the USDA Forest Service. The major question the New York-New Jersey Highlands Regional Assessment Update addressed is, what are the implications of continued land use change patterns on Highlands resources? The assessment focused on land use/land cover change, forest and watershed integrity, hydrologic systems, biodiversity, recreation and open space, population trends and projected future growth.

The study area covered the New York and New Jersey portions of the Highlands physiographic province. All municipalities that are wholly or partially included within the Highlands physiographic boundary, as delineated by the USDA Forest Service, were included in the study.

Supplemental_Information:
The data layer is in ESRI ArcView shape file format generated in the regional context of the project. UTM projection; datum NAD83; spheroid GRS1980; UTM Zone 18. Full documentation/text is available in the Highlands Study Technical Report.
Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Range_of_Dates/Times:
Ending_Date: 2002
Currentness_Reference: publication date
Status:
Progress: Complete
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: None planned
Spatial_Domain:
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -75.206929
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -73.520463
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 41.654572
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 40.527394
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Theme_Keyword: buildout
Theme_Keyword: high constraint scenario
Theme_Keyword: low constraint scenario
Theme_Keyword: census
Theme_Keyword: population
Theme_Keyword: zoning
Theme_Keyword: housing units
Theme_Keyword: vacant land
Theme_Keyword: New York / New Jersey Highlands Regional Assessment Update
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Place_Keyword: Highlands
Place_Keyword: New York
Place_Keyword: New Jersey
Place_Keyword: Dutchess County, NY
Place_Keyword: Orange County, NY
Place_Keyword: Putnam County, NY
Place_Keyword: Rockland County, NY
Place_Keyword: Westchester County, NY
Place_Keyword: Bergen County, NJ
Place_Keyword: Hunterdon County, NJ
Place_Keyword: Morris County, NJ
Place_Keyword: Passaic County, NJ
Place_Keyword: Somerset County, NJ
Place_Keyword: Sussex County, NJ
Place_Keyword: Warren County, NJ
Use_Constraints:
While efforts have been made to ensure that these data are accurate and reliable, Rutgers University cannot assume liability for any damages, or misrepresentations, caused by any inaccuracies in the data, or as a result of the data to be used on a particular system. Rutgers University makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, data will credit the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, and cite the USDA Forest Service Technical Report (as stated under the 'Cross-Reference' section of this metadata).

Terms of Use:

The user agrees to abide by the following terms of use:

1. The Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College, Rutgers University, disseminates this data layer as-is and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution consitute such a warranty. 2. The user should be aware that the data set is not intended for site specific analysis, however, its intention is to provide the end user with a regional-scale raster grid representation of a particular theme for which it was used in the Highlands Regional Study. 3. CRSSA, Rutgers University, will not be held responsible to further maintain the disseminated data, nor to provide the data in different formats other than its current availability. 4. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing this raster grid will credit the original author(s) as listed in the metadata (citation) as well as the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University.

Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Organization_Primary:
Contact_Organization:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA)
Address: Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences Building
Address: Cook College, Rutgers University
Address: 14 College Farm Road
City: New Brunswick
State_or_Province: New Jersey
Postal_Code: 08901-8551
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 732-932-1582
Hours_of_Service: M-F 8.30AM-4.30PM EST USA
Data_Set_Credit:
Processing and analysis by the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College, Rutgers University, for the USDA Forest Service Highlands Regional Assessment Update (2001-02).
Native_Data_Set_Environment:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Version 5.1 (Build 2600) Service Pack 1; ESRI ArcCatalog 8.3.0.800
Cross_Reference:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Published by the USDA Forest Service
Publication_Date: 2002
Title:
New York / New Jersey Highlands Regional Assessment Update (2001-02): Technical Report
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: document

Data_Quality_Information:
Attribute_Accuracy:
Positional_Accuracy:
Horizontal_Positional_Accuracy:
Horizontal_Positional_Accuracy_Report:
Original vector components inputs were rasterized and incorporated into Geographic Information System (GIS) models processed by CRSSA at a ground cell spatial resolution of 30 x 30 meters. Spatial accuracies are dependent on source vector data from various organizations.
Lineage:
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
(FOR FULL BUILDOUT DOCUMENTATION, PLEASE REFER TO THE HIGHLANDS STUDY TECHNICAL REPORT)

The following text was extracted from the Technical Report. For more information and buildout results, please refer to the Technical Report.

Methods

How was the build-out analysis applied?

The first step of the build-out analysis for the Highlands was to map "vacant" land, i.e. privately owned land that was presently not developed. This was accomplished by removing from consideration places where future development and population change would not be expected. All publicly and privately owned conservation lands, military lands and lands with mapped conservation easements (see Section II.C) were excluded. Areas mapped as already developed, based on the Land Use/Land Cover analysis (see Section III.D below), and areas that were already built as densely as allowed by current zoning were excluded. In addition, small tracts of undeveloped lands within a matrix of existing development that were less than 1 acre in size were further excluded. As the focus was on residential development and future population growth, commercially and industrially-zoned areas were also removed from consideration.

The second step was to further exclude land based on various regulatory constraints. In order to provide multiple outcomes, two different scenarios were constructed to show potential patterns of varying impacts: Low-constraint scenario map of areas that would presumably develop if current policies (including zoning) were continued unchanged indefinitely, and High-constraint scenario map of areas that would presumably develop if a few current policies (excluding zoning) were changed to increase the constraints on future development. After removing these constrained areas, the remaining area was then considered "available" for residential development.

The build-out analysis relied on existing land use zoning data to map out possible future land use patterns. Digital zoning mapped data for the New Jersey Highlands municipalities was acquired from the Environmental Defense Fund (in New York City). These digital maps were edge matched and quality checked and the zoning designation updated as appropriate. Zoning maps and data for the New York municipalities were acquired from a variety of local and county sources. Digital data was acquired for Orange, Rockland and Westchester counties from the county planning departments. Zoning maps were digitized for Dutchess and Putnam Counties. These digital maps were edge-matched and quality checked. The zoning ordinances from more than 100 different municipalities had to be generalized to create a standard zoning density map across the entire study area (Figure 31).

The map of "available" land was cross-tabulated with land use zoning maps to estimate the density of future development and calculate the number of additional housing units that might potentially be built. In "available" land areas where new development was calculated, 20% of the area was removed from consideration to account for future infrastructure necessary to support the new development. Based on the 2000 Census average of number of people per household for that locality, the additional population was then estimated. The final numbers were then summarized to describe the population that could inhabit the area under the previously described set of assumptions.

As one means of assessing the validity of the overall build-out modeling approach, the build-out model was applied to the present (i.e. Year 2000) development patterns. Using the low constraint scenario rules (i.e. existing regulations), the number of housing units allowable under existing zoning was estimated. The model estimates of housing units and population were then compared with the 2000 Census data on a study area-wide basis.

What are the limitations of build-out analysis?

The build-out analysis of the Highlands describes a future scenario that is based on an assumption that existing zoning policies continue unchanged into the foreseeable future. While one may argue that this is unrealistic, as zoning and associated policies will certainly change in the future, the build-out analysis provides a meaningful measure of the capacity of an area under an assumed set of constraints. To understand the results of the analysis, it is important to recognize some of the limitations including problems related to: The temporal nature of the data assumptions of the analysis; Generalized zoning data; and The scale of analysis.

One of the basic problems with this type of analysis is that it relies heavily on current zoning data. Each of the more than 100 municipalities in the Highlands has the opportunity to change zoning for individual properties each month. Almost as quickly as a zoning map can be compiled for the Highlands, it begins to fade in its ability to reflect the zoning of the region. While some of the zoning adjustments are insignificant, a municipality could adopt a new plan for a new town center or apartment complexes that will lead to dramatic increases in population. This change would not be reflected in the build-out analysis and would result in an underestimate of future population numbers. Additional properties will inevitably also be bought or preserved as open space, reducing the final built area and population numbers as compared to the build-out analysis. More dramatic policies and projects such as new highways, environmental regulations, and land acquisition will all work quickly to change the future of the Highlands in ways that we cannot presently predict.

The build-out analysis is based on a series of assumptions that are fairly limiting. Aside from the temporal assumption described previously, a build-out analysis assumes that all buildable properties will be built to their fullest capacity and that the houses built will hold the area's average number of people per household. These assumptions may reflect large regional trends, but can be problematic in areas with unusual patterns of change, such as a sudden shift to "empty nesters" (i.e. couples whose children have left home for college and life, but who often continue to maintain a larger home).

In order to analyze the entire region, the zoning ordinances from more than 100 different municipalities had to be generalized to make them comparable. Local variations and distinctions in the zoning ordinances get lost in this sort of analysis. The build-out analysis for the Highlands was conducted with an awareness of these issues in an attempt to minimize their impact, but many subtleties and complex mechanisms suffer from this necessary generalization.

Finally, it is important to understand that a build-out analysis is conducted at a large regional scale, making it impossible to include some of the careful intertwining of development and constrained areas. A simple example of this problem is that a 100-acre parcel with 50 acres of wetlands and wetlands buffer might sometimes be carefully subdivided into 5-acre lots in a spatial arrangement that still achieves the maximum 20 houses, without infringing upon the wetlands. The build-out analysis would only calculate the area as having room for ten 5-acre lots.

What are the criteria for the low-constraint map?

The intent of the low-constraint scenario was to map those areas that would presumably develop if a few current policies were changed to increase the constraints on future development (Figure 32). These constraints were: Known public lands and preserved lands (this includes state parks, local parks, federal properties, and known conservation easements), Open water with 50-foot buffers, Wetlands with 50-foot buffers, Slopes over 33%, Areas zoned for non-residential use, and Residential areas already built to their zoning capacity.

The wetlands for the low-constraint map were delineated based on the existing maps from the New York State DEC and the New Jersey DEP delineation of regulated fresh water wetlands. The known public lands included only those water supply lands that were known to the assessment team to be permanently preserved lands. For example, portions of the Newark water supply areas that are not protected by Green Acres are considered eligible for development under the low-constraint scenario.

These constraints are based on a series of assumptions designed to reflect realistic patterns of future development. The 33% limitation on slope does not reflect existing zoning limitations in most places, but is meant to approximate a significant reduction of housing density on particularly steep slopes. The buffers do not generally reflect existing polices, but recognizes that a limited amount of housing would be built directly on stream banks and the edges of many wetland areas.

What are the criteria for the high-constraint map?

The intent of the high-constraint scenario was to map those areas that would presumably develop if current policies and conditions were modified to provide additional environmental protections (Figure 33). These constraints were: Known public lands and preserved lands (this includes state parks, local parks, federal properties, known conservation easements, and all water supply lands), Open water with 200-foot buffers, Wetlands with 150-foot buffers, Slopes over 15%, Areas zoned for non-residential use, and Residential areas already built to their zoning capacity.

The wetlands for the high-constraint map were different for each state. For New Jersey, the NJ DEP delineation of wetlands was combined with the NWI. For New York, NYS DEC data were combined with the NWI. The known public lands included all known water supply lands as permanently preserved lands.

Potential future constraints are difficult to determine, but the existing constraints were expanded based on pattern in other areas. The 15% limitation on slope reflects some of the more recent zoning ordinances in the greater NY-NJ region. in addition to the previously described justifications, the wider buffers reflect some of the more restrictive buffers used in forestry and planning regulations or practice and are also meant as a consideration of ongoing discussions about increased protection around water and wetland areas. However, the overall restrictiveness of these constraints also helps compensate for other future constraints that are not plausible to include (like private deed-restricted properties, sewer-related limitations, future zoning changes, etc.).

Process_Date:
USDA Forest Service NY/NJ Regional Assessment Update published 2002
Process_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Organization_Primary:
Contact_Organization:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 732-932-1582
Hours_of_Service: M-F 8.30AM-4.30PM EST USA
Contact_Instructions:
- Contact for raster grid processing: CRSSA - Original vectors author(s) from which data was rasterized on-line linkage:

Spatial_Data_Organization_Information:
Direct_Spatial_Reference_Method: Vector
Point_and_Vector_Object_Information:
SDTS_Terms_Description:
SDTS_Point_and_Vector_Object_Type: G-polygon
Point_and_Vector_Object_Count: 108
Raster_Object_Information:
Raster_Object_Type: Grid Cell
Row_Count: 4766
Column_Count: 5000
Vertical_Count: 1

Spatial_Reference_Information:
Horizontal_Coordinate_System_Definition:
Planar:
Grid_Coordinate_System:
Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
UTM_Zone_Number: 18
Transverse_Mercator:
Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 0.999600
Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -75.000000
Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0.000000
False_Easting: 500000.000000
False_Northing: 0.000000
Planar_Coordinate_Information:
Planar_Coordinate_Encoding_Method: coordinate pair
Coordinate_Representation:
Abscissa_Resolution: 0.000256
Ordinate_Resolution: 0.000256
Planar_Distance_Units: meters
Geodetic_Model:
Horizontal_Datum_Name: North American Datum of 1983
Ellipsoid_Name: Geodetic Reference System 80
Semi-major_Axis: 6378137.000000
Denominator_of_Flattening_Ratio: 298.257222

Entity_and_Attribute_Information:
Detailed_Description:
Entity_Type:
Entity_Type_Label: hl_mun_bdout
Entity_Type_Definition: ArcView shape file
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FID
Attribute_Definition: Internal feature number.
Attribute_Definition_Source: ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain:
Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Shape
Attribute_Definition: Feature geometry.
Attribute_Definition_Source: ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Enumerated_Domain:
Unrepresentable_Domain: Coordinates defining the features.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: HI_MCD_ID
Attribute_Definition: unique ID
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: COUNT
Attribute_Definition: -
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FIRST_MCD_
Attribute_Definition: Municipality name
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FIRST_MCD1
Attribute_Definition: Municipality type
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FIRST_MUN
Attribute_Definition: Municipality name and type
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FIRST_CNTY
Attribute_Definition: County
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FIRST_STAT
Attribute_Definition: State
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PNCT_CHGHC
Attribute_Definition:
Pct pop change from Census 2000 to High Constraint buildout scenario
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PNCT_CHGLC
Attribute_Definition:
Pct pop change from census 2000 to low constraint buildout scenario
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: POPDEN_HC
Attribute_Definition: Pop density per acre at High Constraint buildout
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: POPDEN_LC
Attribute_Definition: Pop dens per acre at low constraint buildout
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: AREA
Attribute_Definition: Municipality/polygon area (sq. meters)
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PERIMETER
Attribute_Definition: Municipality/polygon perimeter (meters)
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: ACRES
Attribute_Definition: Total acreage of municipality/polygon
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: POPDEN_CEN
Attribute_Definition: Pop density per acre of municipality (Census 2000)
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: POPDPD_ZON
Attribute_Definition: Buildout verification: population of existing developed area
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: ADDPOP_LC
Attribute_Definition:
Additional population at Low Constraint buildout of available lands
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: ADDPOP_HC
Attribute_Definition:
Additional population at High Constraint buildout of available lands
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: CENSUS_HUS
Attribute_Definition: Number of housing units (Census 2000)
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: HUSDPD_ZON
Attribute_Definition:
Buildout verification: number of housing units in existing developed area
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: ADDHUS_LC
Attribute_Definition:
Additional number of housing units at Low Constraint buildout of available lands
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: ADDHUS_HC
Attribute_Definition:
Additional number of housing units at High Constraint buildout of available lands
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: VACNT_LAND
Attribute_Definition: Acreage of vacant land per municipality
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: AVBLAND_LC
Attribute_Definition:
Acreage of available (developable) land under Low Constraint buildout scenario
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: AVBLAND_HC
Attribute_Definition:
Acreage of available (developable) land under High Constraint buildout scenario
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: CENPOP_DER
Attribute_Definition: Derived population from 2000 census data. (Do not use).
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: CENSUS_POP
Attribute_Definition: Population according to 2000 Census (USE)
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: CEN_POP90
Attribute_Definition: Population according to 1990 Census
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PCTCH90_00
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: POPDEN_90
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PCTCH90_00
Attribute_Definition: Percent change in population 1990-2000 (Census)
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: POPDEN_90
Attribute_Definition: 1990 Population density (people/acre)

Distribution_Information:
Distributor:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Organization_Primary:
Contact_Organization: USDA Forest Service
Resource_Description:
Buildout data prepared by the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, as part of the NY/NJ Highlands Regional Assessment Update (2001-02) directed by the USDA Forest Service.
Distribution_Liability:
While efforts have been made to ensure that these data are accurate and reliable, Rutgers University cannot assume liability for any damages, or misrepresentations, caused by any inaccuracies in the data, or as a result of the data to be used on a particular system. Rutgers University makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, data will credit the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, and cite the USDA Forest Service Technical Report (as stated under the 'Cross-Reference' section of this metadata).

Terms of Use:

The user agrees to abide by the following terms of use:

1. The Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College, Rutgers University, disseminates this data layer as-is and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution consitute such a warranty. 2. The user should be aware that the data set is not intended for site specific analysis, however, its intention is to provide the end user with a regional-scale representation of a particular theme for which it was used in the Highlands Regional Study. 3. CRSSA, Rutgers University, will not be held responsible to further maintain the disseminated data, nor to provide the data in different formats other than its current availability. 4. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing this raster grid will credit the original author(s) as listed in the metadata as well as the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University.

Standard_Order_Process:
Digital_Form:
Digital_Transfer_Information:
Transfer_Size: 0.372
Technical_Prerequisites:
Geographic Information Systems (GIS); knowledge of raster grid data applications and usage is helpful; understanding the context in which the data was processed for the NY/NJ Highlands Regional Assessment Update (2001-02) directed by the USDA Forest Service is also useful. The final and technical reports are available through the Forest Service.

Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20031106
Metadata_Review_Date: unk
Metadata_Future_Review_Date: unk
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Organization_Primary:
Contact_Organization:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA)
Address: Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences Building
Address: Cook College, Rutgers University
Address: 14 College Farm Road
City: New Brunswick
State_or_Province: New Jersey
Postal_Code: 08901-8551
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 732-932-1582
Hours_of_Service: M-F 8.30AM-4.30PM EST USA
Metadata_Standard_Name: FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001-1998
Metadata_Time_Convention: local time
Metadata_Use_Constraints:
Metadata generated by the Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, for the NY/NJ Highlands Regional Assessment Update (2001-02) directed by the USDA Forest Service.
Metadata_Extensions:
Profile_Name: ESRI Metadata Profile
Metadata_Extensions:
Online_Linkage: <http://www.esri.com/metadata/esriprof80.html>
Profile_Name: ESRI Metadata Profile

Generated by mp version 2.7.33 on Thu Nov 06 16:29:35 2003